Category: Other Games

I have to admit I wasn’t aware at how easily I could get money to buy C.R.E.D.D with almost no work from myself. No, this isn’t a pitch to buy something or a get rich scheme, its pretty simple, honestly and ill explain below.

Recently there has been some news about Mojang changing their EULA to restrict private servers from charging real money for in-game services. This quickly spawned discussions on reddit and almost all major gaming news organizations gave their take on it. To be fair, the EULA was reworded, but the rules had been the same for some time. The difference here is that Mojang has never enforced its EULA rules, and it has actually endorsed some of those pay2win servers which makes their EULA void. They cannot forbid something in their EULA and support a server who is breaking it.

After my last minecraft project I wanted to take it easy. I didn’t to plan a project out angle by angle and block by block. I wanted something a bit easier so I decided to do an American Flag. But even though it was built in survival I wanted to make something that I hadn’t seen before so I decided to use lava, snow and water for red, white and blue. Now I know that lava isn’t a perfect match for red, because it’s orange but call it creative freedom because it looks awesome. The flag is 117 blocks tall 222 blocks wide and it is to scale.

I have been playing minecraft for several years and I have always had a way of mining that I thought was most efficient. I have had discussions with friends who think that creating new tunnels every two blocks is more efficient than creating them every three blocks. I decided to put some numbers to the test to see how efficient and effective my method was in reality.

One of the communities that I was a part of had a competition a few months back for its players to build anything they want in survival mode on the server. That means gathering all the materials and placing everything manually, no copy and pasting. Anything could be built and a winner would be chosen. I decided to build a large Heavy Electron Blaster Cannon from eve-online, it was about 65 blocks wide and 85 long, over 60 tall. Wool was used for most of the construction I did highlight some lines with a little obsidian and stone. Truth be told I would have preferred to use diamond blocks over light blue wool but I did not have the 200+ blocks needed to complete this project. Now the inside is hollow and because I am unaware of what actually is inside I just created a small pulsing circuit to “charge” the main gun. The most difficult part was matching the angles of the Electron Blaster in Eve-online on Minecraft which only uses square blocks. Here is the result:HEB-Front

In Part 1 of this series, I spent quite a bit of time talking about teamwork and communication and how that is so essential to the success of any team. I hope you read that and understand it, because everything else I’m going to write is based on those concepts.

 

Now let’s move it to the next level, from generalities to specifics. Succeeding as a team can be boiled down into two basic, simple ideas: understanding your objective and understanding your role. Your objective is what your team all together is trying to accomplish, and is determined by the game mode you are playing. Your role is what you individually are trying to accomplish, and is determined by which class you are playing.

I've never been lonelier...

I’ve never been lonelier…

“What is an MMO?”  As more and more games get announced with the MMO tag, I’ve found myself questioning its definition more and more.  In the present wave of MMOs, arguably with Guild Wars 2 leading the charge, the industry seems to be pushing the concept of the Dynamic Event – a public event that occurs “randomly” in order to provide immersion.  After all, the “Massively” in MMO surely requires a large, expansive and immersive world, right?

In my last article – my “review” of Team Fortress 2 – I discussed the phenomenon of Free-to-Play (F2P) and how it managed to infuse new life into an old game. Of course, it also kicked off one of the all-time great debates in the history of Team Fortress 2. Sure, F2P brought in a bunch of brand new players to the game, but it also . . . brought in a bunch of brand new players to the game. This sudden and overwhelming influx of hundreds and hundreds of noobs* into the servers did a lot to keep the game fresh and new, but it also did a lot to make the servers – especially the public servers – extremely chaotic and sometimes very frustrating.